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You are here: Home What we do Documentation and systematisation Case studies Tanzania: Rights Based Livelihood Programme for the Fulfilment of the Right to Adequate Food and the Right to Land

Tanzania: Rights Based Livelihood Programme for the Fulfilment of the Right to Adequate Food and the Right to Land

CONCERN Tanzania - 2008

Rights-based livelihood programme in Iringa and Mtwara - documentation workshopConcern Tanzania has been implementing a three year pilot programme in Mtwara, Kilolo and Iringa Districts that was meant to run from January 2005 to December 2007 but has been extended to December 2009.

The programme focuses on the right to land the right to adequate food and is the first time Concern in Tanzania has attempted to implement a programme using rights based approaches.

The programme is being implemented through both government and civil society partners, and has had many challenges in its early implementation associated both with partners, but also with considerable staff changes necessitated to ensure the programme moves forward.

"As we have demonstrated here, anyone can use it, and we’ve seen that even farmers can be part of a documentation process"

The programme's goal is to enhance the capacity and interaction of rights holders and duty bearers to realise their roles and responsibilities in respecting, protecting, and fulfilling the right to adequate food and the right to land for the poor and vulnerable citizens in Iringa, Kilolo and Mtwara Districts.

The main purpose is to enhance the capacity and interaction of rights holders and duty bearers to realise their roles and responsibilities in respecting, protecting, and fulfilling the right to adequate food and the right to land for the poor and vulnerable citizens in Iringa, Kilolo and Mtwara Districts.

ILEIA was invited to facilitate the completion of the documentation process which started in that workshop, but we were unable to accept during the last months of 2007, nor during the first months of 2008. As the programme is being implemented in two different regions, it was finally agreed to run a workshop in two different locations simultaneously, and then to present the results together.

The Iringa workshop was held in a small hotel on the highway, 80km before Iringa, some 500 km west of Dar es Salaam. There were 19 participants. The workshop in Mtwara was held in the premises of the Vocational Training and Education Authority (VETA), outside the town. In a similar way to the workshop in Iringa, there were 20 participants, including two of CONCERN’s local staff. In both cases, ILEIA presented a methodology to follow, and all participants went through it.

Although these two workshops were only the first step of their documentation process, we were able to draw some basic lessons. We were pleased to hear that “this tool is simple and straightforward, and therefore very adequate”. “As we have demonstrated here, anyone can use it, and we’ve seen that even farmers can be part of a documentation process”. “This is good, we can also use it for writing our annual reports”. “I like it, you learn even without noticing that you are learning”.

Among the lessons learnt during these workshops, we recognize the importance of:Rights-based livelihood programme in Iringa and Mtwara - documentation workshop (group photo)Rights-based livelihood programme in Iringa and Mtwara - documentation workshopRights-based livelihood programme in Iringa and Mtwara - documentation workshopRights-based livelihood programme in Iringa and Mtwara - documentation workshop (ploughing)

  1. collecting, and considering, previously written reports or evaluations. CONCERN gave us several of these, all of which helped us understand the nature of the programme, as well as to start the documentation process (especially in setting the boundaries);
  2. a well organised workshop. Not only did CONCERN send us the necessary information in advance, they also organised both workshops very efficiently. The selected the venues, took care of all logistics, and invited representatives of different organisations to them, ensuring that, in both cases, we had a truly participatory and representative multi-stakeholder process;
  3. considering pre-defined indicators for the analysis. Although this reduces the participants’ role, it makes the analysis easier;
  4. the field visit. These were very useful for us, as they helped us understand the nature of the programme’s activities, and also allowed us to talk to farmers. But these visits are particularly important to those documenting, as the provide an opportunity for confirming observations, or for getting new ideas;
  5. going through the results after finishing the workshop, and getting feedback from participants. We had a full day after the field visit to add new ideas to the tables, to translate them into English, and to make sure that they reflect the opinions of all those involved. Back in Dar es Salaam, we also had the opportunity to present the results of both workshops in CONCERN’s main offices, and plan future activities with the directors (see below);
  6. having effective facilitation, especially where translation is necessary. Both workshops were conducted in Kiswahili. While in plenary this is less of a problem (as the facilitator can be translated directly) it means that outside facilitators have difficulty in joining and assisting the group work. In Iringa these difficulties were overcome by simultaneous translation of presentations, and by ensuring that participants understood the task by going through an example while still in the large group. The additional benefit of this is that the co-facilitator from CONCERN, Aswani Adams, is now very capable of facilitating any such workshops in future.

Some of the difficulties we encountered were similar to those seen in previous exercises, such as the fact that farmers participate less (especially if sitting together with district authorities or with representatives of the NGO they work with), or that “we are not used to thinking critically, so we find this difficult”.

Once again, effective facilitation, especially during the group work, is necessary to encourage farmers to express their opinions, and to make sure that the reasons behind the different activities and the different results achieved come up in the analysis.


More information?
Please write to Aswani Adams, Programme Director
CONCERN Tanzania
169 Regent Estate, Mikocheni, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
E-mail: aswani.adams@concern.net
www.concern.net

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