Personal tools
Log in
Personal tools
Log in
Recently visited
Related items
Published by
Logo: ILEIA Netherlands
You are here: Home Magazines Global edition Wastes wanted

Wastes wanted

This issue of the ILEIA Newsletter focuses on recycling of organic waste, at urban as well as farm level. To what extent is organic waste used and brought back to the land? What are the major constraints to bend the linear flows of the organic matter and nutrients? What are promising experiences to make recycling of organic waste more efficient and profitable?

Table of contents:

  • 1 - 1
  • 2 - 3
  • 4 - 5
    This issue of the ILEIA Newsletter focuses on recycling og organic waste, at urban as well as farm level. To what extent is organic waste used and brought back to the land? What are the major constraints to bend the linear flows of the organic matter and nutrients? What are promising experiences to make recycling of organic waste more efficient and profitable?
  • 6 - 8
    In many cities in low and middle income countries, municipal refuse collection and disposal services are woefully inadequate and thus, waste accumulates in the streets and at transfer stations. Large scale high-tech recycling projects have failed because installations were too complicated, too expensive to run and not suited for local conditions. Consequently, some facilities have been closed down and many operate well below their planned capacities. Alternative methods are sought to utilise this important resource more effectively. At the request of the Undugu Society of Kenya (USK), a comprehensive research was carried out (1991-1993) in Africa and Asia to study options for solid waste recycling appropriate for small-scale enterprises. Organic waste was one of the ten materials researched.
  • 9 - 9
    \"In the past we suffered because there were no trucks that came to collect our garbage. Now we don\'t need them, because the limited amount of garbage produced is used to prepare food for the earthworms.\" This was said by Don Felix, when we visited him to check how things were going two months after our waste management pilot project using earthworms had started. Then, for a moment forgetting his usual shyness, he started asking us all about the recommended procedures for harvesting the compost, its subsequent drying, sifting and prices and contacts for its sale.
  • 10 - 11
    Human excreta, or night soil, has been used in China to fertilise crops and feed fish for thousands of years. Presently, some 164.25 million tonnes of night soil are produced every year by 300 million people in 479 cities. After a period of disinterest, night soil again gets the attention it deserves, being a valuable resource rather than a contaminant. However, to make safe handling possible, treatment of the raw night soil is necessary.
  • 12 - 13
    An investigation was carried out in Ghana on the use and fertilising potential of organic waste from large-scale agro-industries and municipal waste. With present fertiliser prices, agro-industrial by-products that are sold as animal feed can never compete with imported fertiliser. Even subsidised compost cannot compete with imported fertiliser. But maybe the value of organic material is underestimated? A report from Ghana.
  • 14 - 14
    The oil palm, growing in the lowlands of the humid tropics is an ideal crop. It provides a permanent cover for the land, high quantities of organic matter and nutrients are returned to the field the whole year round. Agricultural waste can be used as source of energy for processing the product. But recycling of high amounts of crop residues is not an easy job and may be a threat to the environment.
  • 15 - 15
    The concept of inoculating soils and plants with beneficial micro organisms to create a more favourable environment for plant growth has been discussed for decades by agricultural research scientists. However, the technology behind this concept and its practical application have now been significantly advanced by Professor Teruo Higa, at the University of Ryukyus in Okinawa, Japan
  • 16 - 17
    On 28 June 1994, Mr. K.T. Thomas Kuruvinakunnel was awarded the 1994 gold medal for innovations in sustainable farming techniques, sponsored by the United Planters\' Association of Southern India (UPASI), the Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad and the central government organisation Coconut Development Board. In this article Mr. Thomas describes the compost-cum-biogas technique, which is part of an integrated rubber-based organic farming system.
  • 18 - 19
    Farmers in Gujarat experiment with Micronutrient Fortified Compost. The results are promising: higher yields, more efficient use of farmyard manure, better payment of farm labourers and an improved hygienic conditions in villages.
  • 20 - 21
    Vermiculture, as propagated by the Bhawalkar Earthworm Research Institute (BERI), is a form of appropriate biotechnology for conversion of organic wastes into valuable humus and plant nutrients. Applied in agriculture, vermiculture also enhances soil formation and mineralisation and hence creates optimal benefits for plant growth.
  • 22 - 23
    Visualising the relation between farm enterprises and natural resource types enables farmers to explore new ways of recycling. But under which conditions does it economically make sense to recycle? A contribution from the Philippines.
  • 24 - 25
    On the black cotton soils of South Gujarat, sugar cane has been a major cash crop for the last 15 years. It has developed because of a good cooperative establishment and a good demand for sugar. The sugar cane farming system is, however, also an example of the imbalance of the modern agricultural system.
  • 26 - 31
  • 32 - 32
Document Actions
  • Print this Print this