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What are we reading?

Recently released books, reports, manuals, etc.

Global dialogue on family farming, Rome, 27-28 October, 2014

As the facilitating agency of the IYFF, FAO contributed to this worldwide campaign by setting in motion a policy dialogue process, including six Regional Dialogues on Family Farming, civil society consultations at the FAO Regional Conferences - all of which focused attention on the challenges facing family farming and the actions that need to be taken to foster their role as key drivers of food production and stewards of natural resources, territories and landscapes in all regions of the world. This year-long process culminated with the Global Dialogue on Family Farming which proved to be a phenomenal representation of the energy and action that characterized the entire Year.

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Final report for the International Symposium on Agroecology for Food Security and Nutrition (18 and 19 September 2014, Rome, Italy)

FAO held the International Symposium on Agroecology for Food Security and Nutrition in Rome on 18 and 19 September 2014 and a side-event on the Symposium during COAG on 30 September 2014. This report provides an overview of the Symposium and the COAG side-event.

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Results-Based Management for sustaining rural poverty reduction: Lessons from IFAD 7th regional forum

Results-Based Management is no longer just an option. It actually is opting for performance. Projects must produce the best results possible through capacity-building and existing instruments, based on best management practices that have been proven to be effective. This special edition of AGRIDAPE, published by IED Afrique, falls within this context. The goal is to help document and share the forum’s main results and lessons on a larger scale.

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Soil Atlas: Facts and figures about earth, land and fields

We are using the world’s soils as if they were inexhaustible, continually withdrawing from an account, but never paying in. For it takes several thousand years to build a thin layer of fertile topsoil, but only an hour of heavy rain to lose it. The average European needs 1.3 hectares – two football pitches – to produce all of the food and other products he or she consumes each year. That is about six times more than is available to each Bangladeshi. Almost 60 percent of the area consumed by Europeans lies outside the European Union. Global demand for food, fodder and biofuels is on the rise. So too are land prices. In many regions, the struggle for secure land rights is a struggle for survival for individuals and communities. The global significance of soils demands global responses. 2015 is the International Year of Soils. In this year, the United Nations wants to further the goal of soil protection. This Soil Atlas shows what can succeed and why the soil should concern us all.

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Handbook on capitalisation of experiences 2012: Knowledge management and adaptation to climate change

This manual, developed by IED Afrique, provides guidance on how to draw lessons from farmers’ experiences in climate change adaptation. The enormous challenge of adaptating to climate change requires the systematisation and sharing of these lessons, so that new and ongoing initiatives can be improved. The manual builds on Learning from experience. It offers a refresher on key concepts in systematisation, and outlines practical steps and tools.

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Manuel sur la capitalisation des experiences 2012: Gestion des connaissances

French version of the manual: Handbook on capitalisation of experiences 2012: Knowledge management and adaptation to climate change

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Spécialisation ou diversification? Perspectives divergentes sur la riziculture irriguée par trois grands barrages dans le Sahel

French version of the report: Specialisation or diversification? Divergent perspectives on rice farming in three large dam-irrigated areas in the Sahel

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Gaining control over our food systems: The right to food, agroecology and food sovereignty

In order to combat hunger and malnutrition, we need to ensure that the human right to food of vulnerable groups is protected and realized in a way that gives them control over their food and farming systems. There are real opportunities to do so through agroecological farming practices, in which farmers work with nature instead of with chemical inputs, and through producer-consumer initiatives which increase people’s food sovereignty. This information brief was published by ILEIA in collaboration with FIAN and OtherWise.

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Forest and farming families speaking out – Speaking out for forest and farming families

Tropenbos International, the AgriCultures Network and the Forest and Farm Facility, created a space so voices from the fields and forests could be heard at the Global Landscapes Forum, Lima, Peru, (6-7 December 2014).

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Hacia una agricultura familiar más fuerte

Spanish version of the 'Towards stronger family farms: Voices in the International Year of Family Farming'

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Vers une agriculture familiale plus forte: Points de vue au cœur de l’Année internationale de l’agriculture familiale

French version of of the 'Towards stronger family farms: Voices in the International Year of Family Farming'

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Towards stronger family farms: Voices in the International Year of Family Farming

Throughout 2014, regional dialogues, civil society consultations, regional conferences and other events explored issues related to family farming. Many of these were (co-)organised by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the lead agency for the International Year of Family Farming. Across the regions, a set of key, common building blocks were identified to better support family farmers, raised by representatives of farmer organisations, governments, academia, international institutions and NGOs, amongst others.

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Corporate influence through the G8 New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition in Africa

The New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition (G8NA), was inaugurated in 2012 as a commitment by the governments of the G8, African countries and corporate sector partners to lift 50 million people out of poverty in ten years by “unleashing the power of the private sector.” Ten African countries have signed cooperation agreements and several domestic and international companies have pledged to invest in areas relevant to food security and nutrition, amounting to more than US$7 billion. The G8NA has been heavily criticized, however, and this report adds to the discussion. Core problems with the initiative are highlighted, including governance of the alliance, the dominance of large corporate actors, and that it is poorly integrated into existing international processes and agreements. It concludes with a call halting the G8NA altogether unless radical changes are implemented, such as greater transparency, more civil society participation, and framing options within Committee on World Food Security principles and guidelines.

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Deep Roots

To celebrate the International Year of family Farming, FAO produced this extensive tome dedicated to stories surrounding the actual and potential future benefits of family farming. Deep Roots contains some 70 specially commissioned articles on diverse aspects of family farming from around the world, including regional overview papers that summarise the current situation and recent developments in each. ILEIA also contributed with an agroecological perspective in ‘Unlocking the potential of family farmers with agroecology’ (pages 42-45), followed by articles on gender and youth. FAO’S Director General Jose Graziano da Silva tells us that “out of 570 million farms in the world, 500 million are family owned, making the well-being of farm families inextricably woven into the overall wellbeing of societies, with tremendous implications for food production and sustainability.” He also confirms the organisation’s commitment to supporting FAO member states in shaping enabling policies and the knowledge environment for family farming in the years to come. Many photos in the book, including the cover photo, are entries in the AgriCultures Network’s Family Farming Photo Competition.

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Smallholder agriculture’s contribution to better nutrition

For most of the last 50 years, food production has increased ahead of population growth, with much of this coming from small scale family farms. Why then are such households still disproportionately vulnerable to undernutrition? The report does not address this question, as the real answer would indicate that more extreme actions are needed than the general recommendations put forward. These are that smallholder agricultural development can be an excellent way to reduce poverty and tackle hunger, that patterns of agricultural development need steering towards more diversified food production, and that smallholder agricultural programmes need backing up with primary health care, clean water and sanitation, female empowerment and other interventions. No-one may disagree with any of these, but it appears that much more is required, and that would involve a radical change in mindset regarding a rebalancing of power between family farms and local food systems, and the farming for profit agri-business model that currently dominates.

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The Global Nutrition Report 2014: Actions and accountability to accelerate the world’s progress on nutrition

This excellent publication is full of essential reading and valuable figures on nutrition- related issues. It is aimed at nutrition champions and their allies. The authors propose three types of complementary strategies to address challenges underlying malnutrition and hunger: nutrition-specific, nutrition sensitive, and enabling environmental investments. The report concludes that these strategies can have high human and economic returns. But the report fails to highlight the vital role of family farmers, especially women, in combating hunger and malnutrition, a notable omission in a document that appears in the International Year of Family Farming. Thereby, it overlooks the tremendous actual and potential contribution of 500 million family farmers to local and global food and nutrition security.

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The State of Food and Agriculture: Innovation in Family Farming

This annual collection of thoughts and figures on agriculture and agricultural production by the world’s leading organization devoted to food-related issues, is this year dedicated to family farming. The annex tables are as informative as ever, providing an overview of key information regarding trends in land holdings and labour. But the meat is in the text. The pivotal role family farmers play in ensuring that humanity is able to feed itself is clearly expressed. A very thorough review of all recent and relevant literature tries to find out ‘what strategy should be taken towards small family farms?’ The findings stress the importance of recognizing their diversity and the need to improve supplementary or alternative employment and income. However, FAO continue to promote the possibility of ‘sustainable productivity growth’ for poverty reduction and improved food security. To achieve this, it argues for two interrelated pathways: development and application of new technologies and practices via farmer-led and formal research; and application and adaptation of existing technologies and processes alongside traditional integrated farming systems. All in all it provides hope that we are beginning to ‘see the light’, but ensuring that this light burns brightly and continuously is another matter.

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Specialisation or diversification? Divergent perspectives on rice farming in three large dam-irrigated areas in the Sahel

This report is based on the main lessons and recommendations from three case studies analysing the strategies, aspirations and constraints of the various types of farmers living around the dams of Bagré (Burkina Faso), Sélingué (Mali) and Niandouba/Confluent (Senegal). This document aims to contribute to the reflections national and regional reflections on policies and programs to improve rice-based production systems in the irrigated areas and strengthen the livelihoods of farmers.

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Towards Productive Landscapes: ETFRN News 56

The landscape approach has increasingly been promoted as a new perspective on addressing global challenges at a local level. In the face of increasing and competing claims to the land and the exhaustion of natural resources, planners, scientists and policymakers have come to realize the limitations of sectoral approaches. Integrated landscape level considerations have begun to supersede those restricted to, for instance, water, forests, farming and development programmes. Given this interest, and the potential impacts of such initiatives, it is important to learn from the many practical experiences in applying integrated landscape management throughout the world. This issue of ETFRN News 56, ‘Towards productive landscapes’, brings together 29 papers by practitioners from all over the world who highlight the successes and challenges of applying landscape approaches. Jointly, the articles explore: 1) the role of forests in mosaic landscapes; 2) governance arrangements at the landscape scale; and 3) key factors contributing to success in landscape management. This issue of ETFRN News results from a partnership between Tropenbos International (TBI) and the Centre for Learning on Sustainable Agriculture (ILEIA), part of the AgriCultures Network dedicated to landscapes.

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Policy brief: Lessons from the landscape – approaches that work: Ensuring equitable benefits for forest and farming families

This policy brief introduces some common lessons seen where landscape approaches have worked. And it offers suggestions to rural development professionals that can help to consolidate and scale up the successes, for the benefit of the land and the lives of those who depend on it.

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